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Only half of patients take their medications as prescribed: are there interventions that will help them?

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:28

Press Release

Strictly Embargoed Until 00.01 Hours (GMT), Thursday, November 20, 2014

Media contacts:

Wiley

Evelyn Martinez (US): +1 201 748 6358

sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

Cochrane

Jo Anthony (UK): +44 (0) 1865 310138 or +44 (0) 7990 031904

pressoffice@cochrane.org

Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Cochrane CEAD Email address:  pressoffice@cochrane.org

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Tweetchat for patient-preferred fibromyalgia outcomes

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 17:41

Three Cochrane Review Groups - Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care (PaPaS), Musculoskeletal (MSG) and Neuromuscular Diseases (NMD) - are planning to hold an hour-long Tweetchat on patient-preferred fibromyalgia outcomes on Tuesday 9th December, at 13:00 GMT, using the hashtag #CCFibro.

For more information, see below:

Objective: for Cochrane Review Groups to engage with relevant consumer and patient groups using simple questions to identify important outcomes in fibromyalgia, via Twitter.

Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Anna Hobson Email address:  anna.hobson@ndcn.ox.ac.uk

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Canadian Cochrane Centre announces winners of its 'What's your story?' competition

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Fri, 14/11/2014 - 23:20

The Canadian Cochrane Centre (CCC) is pleased to announce the winners of its 'What's your story?' competition, highlighting stories of how Cochrane evidence has made an impact on the lives of Canadians.

External link for more information:  http://ccnc.cochrane.org/winners-whats-your-story-compe... Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Lori Tarbett Email address:  ltarbett@ohri.ca

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How many randomised trials can we find in 48 hours?

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Thu, 13/11/2014 - 14:21

Quite a few when you work as a team!

External link for more information:  http://www.metaxis.com/embase/login.php Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Anna Noel-Storr Email address:  anna.noel-storr@rdm.ox.ac.uk

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James Lind Alliance launches Priority Setting Partnership for hearing loss research

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Thu, 13/11/2014 - 05:50

A new survey about prioritising research questions in mild to moderate hearing loss has been launched by the James Lind Alliance (JLA), with the support of UK-based Cochrane contributors. The JLA has set up a Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) to identify unanswered questions for mild-moderate hearing loss; its causes, diagnosis, management and self-management.

External link for more information:  http://www.hearinglink.org/jla-psp/survey Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Sarah Chapman Email address:  Sarah.Chapman@cochrane.nhs.uk

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Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group announces the establishment of a Suicide and Self-Harm Satellite

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Tue, 11/11/2014 - 01:31

It is with great pleasure that the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group (CCDAN) announces the formation of a Suicide and Self-Harm satellite based in Swansea, Wales.

External link for more information:  http://ccdan.cochrane.org/ Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Jessica Sharp Email address:  contact@ccdan.org

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Antibiotics: on-the-spot tests reduce unnecessary prescriptions

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Thu, 06/11/2014 - 21:17

Strictly Embargoed Until 00.01 Hours (GMT), Thursday, November 6, 2014
[19.01 Hours US Eastern Time, Wednesday, November 5 /11.01 Hours Australian Eastern Daylight Time (AEDT), November 6]

Media contacts:
Evelyn Martinez (US): +1 201 748 6358
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Cochrane Press Office: Jo Anthony (UK): +44 (0) 1865 310138 or (0) 7990 031904
pressoffice@cochrane.org

Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Cochrane CEAD Email address:  pressoffice@cochrane.org

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Evaluate the 22nd Cochrane Colloquium

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Thu, 06/11/2014 - 06:24

Please take some time to fill out the evaluation forms for the 22nd Cochrane Colloquium using the link provided below.  

If you were a day registrant, you can give your feedback just for that particular day.

External link for more information:  https://colloquium.cochrane.org/22nd-cochrane-colloquiu... Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Anna Joseph Email address:  annajoseph@cmcvellore.ac.in

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Cannabis: A precursor of psychosis.

The Service User Perspective - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 14:53
Cannabis is often the precursor of psychosis, especially paranoia. Anecdotally it seems to exacerbate psychotic moods and symptoms. My own view is that it cannot possibly benefit sufferers and it seems risky to prescribe it (if I have correctly understood the summary) at all. I remember Professor Robin Murray saying some years ago that cannabis was implicated in the causation of mental illness. Well, he should know and I don't suppose his views have become obsolete.

Acupuncture: Used more widely.

The Service User Perspective - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 14:47
Larger scale trials are needed with or without medication, unless the latter option is too risky. I would vouch for the benefits of acupuncture to support well-being and would like to see it used more widely.

How many randomised trials can we find in 48 hours?

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Thu, 30/10/2014 - 11:11

The first ever citation screening challenge is complete!

Starting at 15:00 GMT on Friday 31st October and running for 48 hours, around 75 EMBASE project screeners worked their way through 20,709 citations, in the process identifying 1713 RCTs. To put this into context, this work, completed in two days, is about the same amount of records as screeners typically review in two months.

External link for more information:  http://www.metaxis.com/EmbaseChallenge Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Anna Noel-Storr Email address:  anna.noel-storr@rdm.ox.ac.uk

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Expectant mothers with epilepsy face tough choices over their medication - new Cochrane Evidence

Current news at The Cochrane Collaboration - Thu, 30/10/2014 - 03:34

Strictly Embargoed Until 00.01 Hours (GMT), Thursday, October 30, 2014
[20.01 Hours US Eastern Time (EDT), October 29 /11.01 Hours Australian Eastern Daylight Time (AEDT), October 30]

Media contacts:
Evelyn Martinez (US): +1 201 748 6358
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Cochrane Press Office: Jo Anthony (UK): +44 (0) 1865 310138 or (0) 7990 031904
pressoffice@cochrane.org

External link for more information:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD0... Contributor's Information Contributor's name:  Cochrane CEAD Email address:  pressoffice@cochrane.org

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Cannabis for schizophrenia: the need for people's views.

The Service User Perspective - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 13:27
The cannabis summary raised many questions for me as it has, I believe, been indicated that the drug can bring on psychosis rather than treat it. Surely there is some good, well-based research around that can do good to the people who have psychosis, and can suggest steps to improve treatments and care.

It seems to me that what is missing is the views of parents and partners of patients who can give their take on what the patients are reporting. Only then will the true picture of the situation of people with psychosis be available, as patient views would be ratified - or contradicted - by those involved in their care long-term.

Cannabis and psychosis: A carer's view.

The Service User Perspective - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 13:20
There does not seem to be much rigorous research on this subject. I feel the effect of cannabis on the developing brain of teenagers cannot be overstated, articles always allude to "an increased risk of psychosis" but what this means in reality, the devastation of mental health problems and schizophrenia particularly is never explained or demonstrated.

Our son started experimenting with cannabis when he was fourteen and we feel strongly that this contributed to his developing schizophrenia from about the age of seventeen. It became apparent during his prolonged stay in a psychiatric unit under a section that he was also treatment resistant. Only when he was treated with clozapine which had to be augmented did he begin to stabilise.

The doctor treating him felt that he, in his practice, was seeing more young men like this and he felt that the brain being bathed in these illicit drugs during adolescence was a contributory factor.

Our son managed to procure cannabis whilst in hospital under section and was cautioned and fined for this despite at the time not being deemed fit to make decisions. Fortunately he now no longer smokes cannabis but has to take medication and lives in supported accommodation. He is now 23 years old and is just beginning to have a life again.

Cannabis for schizophrenia: Unpredictable and disastrous.

The Service User Perspective - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 13:16
Cannabis - No! That is something I gave up because one day I started feeling alarmingly weird, dizzy and disorientated. This is complete madness, not just because of the drug and its effects, but because of the disorganised, chaotic lifestyle of drug users. I know a few people who continued using cannabis well into old age. In every case, they are less than they could have been.

I believe that all mind altering drugs are harmful. The ideal psychiatric system would be Open Dialogue, a non-invasive method with a very minimal use of drugs. ANY mind altering drug is just a short cut, panic measure, which might work for a short time, but with unpredictable and often very disastrous long-term effects.

Acupuncture: Placebo and 'snake oil'?

The Service User Perspective - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 13:11
Concerning acupuncture, I really don't know, I had it once for back pain and it didn't do anything. It may be harmless and could have a placebo effect. A bit of a worry that desperate people might pour money into something akin to 'snake oil'.

Acupuncture, culture and fear of needles: A carer's perspective.

The Service User Perspective - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 13:06
I have to say that for the Acupuncture summary, whereas in China putting needles into people's skin may be normal, in the UK it is not a cultural norm. My daughter would not tolerate acupuncture, I believe, as she hates injections and blood tests - and most other medical interventions. She would benefit more from the social side of any treatment - the care shown and the attention paid her. The confusion of these factors would have to be dealt with if any really valid research was undertaken into the effectiveness of the treatment.

Acupuncture for schizophrenia: A service user's view

The Service User Perspective - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 13:02
I have experienced the effectiveness of acupuncture for physical pain (lower neck has had some pretty strong peer-reviewed evidence of effectiveness, I believe). I don’t know about mental state other than the many reports I’ve had about acupuncture being successful with stopping tobacco smoking. This has always been auricular acupuncture, though, which is quite specialised.

Comment on the latest two summaries.

The Service User Perspective - Tue, 28/10/2014 - 12:59
I have no experience of these two summaries (Cannabis for schizophrenia and Acupuncture for schizophrenia), but from the short summaries you sent, I get the impression that they do not work?

Acupuncture for schizophrenia.

The Service User Perspective - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 11:49
Although acupuncture or Traditional Chinese Medicine has been practised for over 2000 years in China and the Far East, especially in Korea and Japan, it is a relatively new form of treament for physical and psychological conditions in the West. Acupuncture inserts needles into the skin to stimulate specific points of the body (acupoints). The aim is to achieve balance and harmony of the body.

Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness and is usually treated using antipsychotic medication. However, although effective, antipsychotic medication can cause side-effects (such as sleepiness, weight gain and even dribbling). Acupuncture has been shown to have very few negative effects on the individual and could be more socially acceptable and tolerable for people with mental health problems. Acupuncture may also be less expensive than drugs made by pharmaceutical companies, so reducing costs to individuals and health services.

This reviews looks at the effectiveness of various types of acupuncture as treatment for people with schizophrenia. An update search for studies was carried out in 2012 and found 30 studies that randomised participants who were receiving antipsychotic medication to receive additional acupuncture or standard care.

Although some of the studies did favour acupuncture when combined with antipsychotics, the information available was small scale and rated to be very low or low quality by the review authors, so not completely provable and valid. Depression was reduced when combining acupuncture with antipsychotic medication, but again this finding came from small-scale research, so cannot be clearly shown to be true. The review concludes that people with mental health problems, policy makers and health professionals need much better evidence in order to establish if there are any potential benefits to acupuncture.

This means that the question of whether acupuncture is of benefit to people, and whether it is of greater benefit than antipsychotic medication, remains unanswered. There is not enough information to establish that acupuncture is of benefit or harm to people with mental health problems.

See more at: http://summaries.cochrane.org/CD005475/SCHIZ_acupuncture-for-schizophrenia
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